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American Airlines OFAC Declaration


#1

There has been plenty of discussion on other forums as to whether AA (or in fact, other USA airlines) ask passengers to confirm that they comply with OFAC requirements when booking a one-way trip from Cuba to USA.
So, I went on to AA’s website and pretended to be an Australian, Bruce C. Dundee, and did a dummy booking. Below is a screenshot of the window that came up:

It seems if you click on the Start Over button, you get nowhere, and can’t complete a booking. As per the instructions, when you click the Continue button, you agree that you comply with one of the categories.

I am told that if you are not a US citizen, and are flying one-way from Cuba to USA you don’t have to do this, and there is a way around it. So far I have not found out how to do that.


#2

Jack
Where is their form for travelling in the direction you were going?


#3

It’s the same form, regardless of direction. The one I posted is the one that came up when I tried to book Cuba (HAV) to USA (MIA), I realize it says, “Flying to Cuba,” but it is the form that comes up when you try to book the direction I was going (Cuba to USA). And, booking in either direction, you can’t seem to proceed without agreeing that you comply.


#4

So if I fly LATAM to Cuba as a tourist, but cannot fly AA to USA unless I agree I am fly to Cuba with them?
Given I am not flying to Cuba on AA, and was a bona fide tourist when I travelled to Cuba with LATAM, please explain what is sensible about agreeing to the opposite.


#5

There is nothing sensible about it. That’s the whole point, isn’t it?
But how can you proceed with the booking without doing so by clicking the continue button? You say you have done it. How?


#6

Jack
I only completed personal detail at the site and did not tick any OFAC certification when completing the booking with AA. It was both sensible and possible to “ignore” the screen about flying with AA to Cuba given that I was not doing that.


#7

Well, I can’t even get as far as entering personal information before that window comes up.
I enter cities and dates and click on search. Then, I select one of the flights that comes up, and the trip summary for that opens. No personal information asked for yet. Then I click the button that says “Continue as Guest.”
That is when the screen that I show in my first post comes up. What, specifically did you do to “ignore” that? Did you just click “Continue” then?
Please excuse all the detailed questions. I’m really trying to understand how you did this.


#8

The logic to the conundrum you presented is simple.
If I were to fly AA from the USA to Cuba, as the form outlines, I would happily comply with one of the 12 travel reasons. I have no difficulty with that, should it have governed my travels; so I agree and press “continue”.
In this instance the process led me to purchase a ticket in the opposite direction, and did not require an OFAC declaration to be made.
Had the process required an online certification that I was actually travelling (through this booking - from the USA) to Cuba I would have instead booked by phone, as clearly I was going the opposite direction.


#9

More nonsense, and not an answer to what I asked.


#10

Well done elsewhere Jack.
Sadly you refused to discuss this in private, but to call me a liar is unbecoming.
The facts are clear in this matter.
AA do not have a form relating to travel from Cuba to the USA. You confirm this in your reply to me of August 12, and agree it is not a sensible position from AA.
Your specific questions were:

But how can you proceed with the booking without doing so by clicking the continue button? You say you have done it. How?

I repsponded, “It was both sensible and possible to “ignore” the screen about flying with AA to Cuba given that I was not doing that.”
Yesterday I explained the logic underpinning that action.
Your response was:

More nonsense, and not an answer to what I asked.

In fact my replies were precise answers to your questions, and it was possible to agree to a circumstance which might eventuate, in order to continue the booking process.

edited to stay friendly - Spunky