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Bring Pets to Cuba


#1

I have friends from Europe visiting us in June. They want to visit Havana so we will stay in Varadero. Do you know airliners and resorts that accepting pets?. The money is no problem as long as they can take their pets.


#2

Board the pet.
There are so many reasons not to take a pet to Cuba.


#3

Agree with Radar. Bringing a pet to Cuba is just a bad idea. Unless you are employed there and staying for months and months, it just isn’t worth the risk of injury or disease for the pet. Besides which, it is doubtful any of the hotels would accept them.


#4

I agree with the previous posters.
I’ve seen a few resorts that have resident dogs and cats. We have just returned from a resort on Cayo Santa Maria. A couple occasions where 2 dogs barking about something they saw i n the trees. And another female following people, seemingly looking for hand outs. This happened on main pathways where the general public, including children, frequented.
Not sure how the locals dogs will react to you friends pets. Maybe they will be like there Cuban Masters and welcome them with open arms! Just bring “doggy gifts”! lol


#5

I also think of the concerns of a dog not accustom to the tropics. I know our pets would not deal well with the heat, parasites, or other animals of that area. I really do not think it would be a vacation for them not the pet owner with all the additional concerns. I would also think that there might be quarantine issues also …the more I think of the complication and concerns it is not a good idea. If you were moving there permanently another issue…for a vacation not a good idea…


#6

While I am not in Cuba, I had guests at New Years from North Carolina who were on a road trip to Ecuador traveling with 2 small dogs.

They had checked what was needed for each country, the dogs had the required shots & they had no problems traveling with them.

Can’t see why Cuba would be much different, considering the climate is more moderate than here the pets should be fine.

Personally I would never travel with a pet but different strokes for different folks.


#7

If you are on a road trip, with your own vehicle and supplies, that would be different from arriving on a plane to a country where you may not be allowed to import your own pet food and finding a reliable supply of what you need could be an issue. Add to that the danger to your animal if it happens to get loose and stray (sh*t happens, despite precautions, and Murphy says it happens at the most inopportune times). In Cuba, a stray may well be dispatched or stolen before you get a chance to offer a reward. If you check the Aduana website, they also reserve the right to euthanize your animal if they see fit. You may not have the option of putting it on the next flight home if for some unknown reason they deem it unfit to enter the country. Those are only a few of the reasons it is simply a bad idea. Never mind whether anecdotal evidence suggests it will be fine. I wouldn’t risk it.


#8

The people in question didn’t have supplies to last the entire trip.

Your other reasons don’t hold water as the same could happen in any Latin country or for that matter visiting the US from Canada!

My post wasn’t “anecdotal evidence” ??? it was relating what dog lovers that stayed with me were doing & had been doing for the previous 2 months! :sunglasses:

The OP asked a valid question which garnered a lot of theoretical negative replies from people who had never done this, I thought they would appreciate positive feedback from someone with firsthand knowledge of people having a positive experience traveling with pets.

As I said “Different strokes-----” ;D


#9

[quote=@vagabond]
The people in question didn’t have supplies to last the entire trip.[/quote]
Some people are fussy about what their pets eat, some aren’t. Even going to the States from Canada, you can’t bring your dog food with you. Fortunately you can likely buy the same brand there (where yours was likely imported from!)

True enough, although in the U.S. you have a better chance that they don’t euthanize the animal as soon as they pick it up. As Yossarian would say, “what difference does that make” (in response to “they’re shooting at everyone”).

Yeah, it is, by definition. You would need a lot more than one trip by one party…no matter how many countries…for it to be anything else. “Because of the small sample, there is a larger chance that it may be unreliable due to cherry-picked or otherwise non-representative samples of typical cases”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anecdotal_evidence

[quote]The OP asked a valid question which garnered a lot of theoretical negative replies from people who had never done this, I thought they would appreciate positive feedback from someone with firsthand knowledge of people having a positive experience traveling with pets.

As I said “Different strokes-----” ;D[/quote]
Positive is good. Provided the OP understands the negatives as well. No surprises if things don’t go smoothly. Cost/benefit analysis, and all that. You could leave the pet home and have things go awry. But the odds are much less, IMO.


#10

eeeefarm …Can you quote that reference?


#11

eeeefarm …Can you quote that reference?[/quote]
I will have to look it up, but I did see it. Always fun trying to retrace your steps! ;D

Found it!

“Failure to comply with these regulations will mean that your pet may be refused entry and the relevant authority in consultation with an authorized veterinarian can decide to return the pet home, or place the pet in quarantine at the expense of the owner or natural person responsible for pet, or as a last resort, without financial compensation, put the pet down where the return trip home or quarantine cannot be arranged.”

http://www.pettravel.com/immigration/CUBA.cfm

Note that this is not an official Aduana website, but I don’t doubt the information.


#12

[quote=@eeeefarm][quote=@radar]

eeeefarm …Can you quote that reference?[/quote]
I will have to look it up, but I did see it. Always fun trying to retrace your steps! ;D

Found it!

"Failure to comply with these regulations will mean that your pet may be refused entry and the relevant authority in consultation with an authorized veterinarian can decide to return the pet home, or place the pet in quarantine at the expense of the owner or natural person responsible for pet, or as a last resort, without financial compensation, put the pet down where the return trip home or quarantine cannot be arranged."

http://www.pettravel.com/immigration/CUBA.cfm

Note that this is not an official Aduana website, but I don’t doubt the information. [/quote]
I have never heard that warning given by a Cuban authority. That’s why I asked for the reference.

Pet travel has the “put the pet down” disclaimer/warning for Mexico also and likely every other country they have listed.

I’m not saying it won’t happen. Follow all the rules and you will be fine.
BTW quarantine in Cuba is a home based (house arrest) quarantine where a veterinarian can drop in unannounced.


#13

I agree it is an unlikely outcome, but a possibility, all the same. People forget that we have no “rights” in a foreign country. Get the wrong official annoyed at you, and they can make things pretty difficult. I would not want to be in a situation where my dog bit someone important!

I think pet travel likely wants to give the worst case scenario as a CYA precaution. But people do need to consider that away from home (and even at home!) they may not be able to do much if authorities make an unhappy decision.


#14

nhathanh, I guess the answer is no. Maybe leave their pet in Canada and pick up on the way home. What kind of pet were you asking about, just for my info?


#15

Actually, the discussion may be moot. While I know some carriers will take pets…people have “rescued” dogs and cats from Cuba…I am doubtful many if any hotels there will allow them to stay. Although I suppose the right money in the right hand might change the policy for a week! (strap a harness on the thing and wear your dark glasses! Doesn’t work for a Chihuahua, however.)

Or maybe it does!

"There were two buddies one with a German Shepherd and the other with a Chihuahua. The guy with the German Shepherd says to his friend, “Let’s go over to that restaurant and get something to eat.” The guy with the Chihuahua says, “We can’t go in there. We’ve got dogs with us.” The buddy with the German Shepherd says, “Just follow my lead.” They walk over to the restaurant, the guy with the German Shepherd puts on a pair of dark glasses, and he starts to walk in. The bouncer at the door says, “Sorry, man, no pets allowed.” The man with the German Shepherd says, “You don’t understand. This is my seeing-eye dog.” The man at the door says, “Come on in.” The buddy with the Chihuahua figures, “What the heck,” so he puts on a pair of dark glasses and starts to walk in. Once again the bouncer says, “Sorry, pal, no pets allowed.” The guy with the Chihuahua says, “You don’t understand. This is my seeing-eye dog.” The bouncer at the door says, “A Chihuahua?” The man with the Chihuahua says, “A Chihuahua??? They gave me a f***ing Chihuahua?!”


#16

There was a discussion about this on another forum and the consensus was that it would not be a good idea. Some os the most noted reasons were that pets were not allowed to stay at all inclusive resorts, they are not allowed on beaches, and the availability of canned or dry dog food. pets can be brought into the country provided they have all the proper immunizations and apparently there are casas that will allow pets.
Personally, I would never bring our dog to Cuba. Seeing some of the rail thin ones running loose around the streets, they would have our Cocker Spaniel for a snack.


#17

How exactly was that conclusion arrived at?

All I see are 12 nay saying posts with NO back up, mere personal opinion.

Two positive posts from personal experience.

The one relevant factor has been completely ignored the pets are from Europe so will already be traveling. The only glitch that anyone as come up with is finding a pet friendly resort.

There’s an obvious solution for that, Varadaro now has legal CP’s, let the OP’s friends stay in a CP that welcomes pets, the OP can then book the 5* they desire. The friends will then have a unique chance to experience both aspects of Cuba travel, as I am sure the casa owner would pet-sit while the friends visited the 5* for a bit of beach time. :sunglasses:

I really can’t see why some see the need to make a mountain out of a molehill as I am sure the OP’s European guests are capable of making an informed decision if allowed all the pertinent data. :slight_smile:

Whether the pets are in Canada or Cuba is immaterial as they are traveling anyway. IMHO


#18

Vagabond here are two solid reasons not to take a pet to Cuba …
ehrlichiosis & venerial tumours.
This is not opinion this is fact.


#19

When we stayed at the Melia Las Dunas resort in Cayo Santa Maria a few years ago, we did see two different sets of guests who had traveled with their dogs (small poodle/cross?) . No idea where the guests were from - Canada or Europe but they were not locals.

This came as a surprise to us. We had always believed that resorts didn’t allow pets. The dogs were leashed and we never saw them on the beach but they were with their owners in the lobby and other common areas such as the buffet and bars.

While we personally would not travel with our pet, many people are beginning to demand this as an opinion. They consider their “fur babies” to be just as important in their lives as people who travel with their children. Heck a lot of couples are opting to have pets rather than kids! I’m willing to predict that it won’t be long before pet friendly travel accommodation will become a fast growing segment of the travel industry.


#20

[quote=@yvrck]When we stayed at the Melia Las Dunas resort in Cayo Santa Maria a few years ago, we did see two different sets of guests who had traveled with their dogs (small poodle/cross?) . No idea where the guests were from - Canada or Europe but they were not locals.

This came as a surprise to us. We had always believed that resorts didn’t allow pets. The dogs were leashed and we never saw them on the beach but they were with their owners in the lobby and other common areas such as the buffet and bars.

While we personally would not travel with our pet, many people are beginning to demand this as an opinion. They consider their “fur babies” to be just as important in their lives as people who travel with their children. Heck a lot of couples are opting to have pets rather than kids! I’m willing to predict that it won’t be long before pet friendly travel accommodation will become a fast growing segment of the travel industry.[/quote]
There were families at SCSM that had pets with them. The husbands were working on new construction (management, or supervisory work, I believe) and had brought their families with them, complete with pets. But they were there long term…long enough that I saw the same people/pets on visits months apart.

I agree with you that the “fur kids” are more likely to be accommodated in future, but it is early days, even here. Give it awhile for third world countries to be welcoming, although money certainly talks if you have enough of it.

If one worked out the details with the Casa owner beforehand, perhaps that would be possible. Bearing in mind that a Casa is not a kennel, and you would be relying on inexperienced strangers to care for your pet. (lots of things can go wrong, from inappropriate food to insufficient supervision).

Whether the pets are in Canada or Cuba? I doubt there are licensed, insured boarding kennels in Cuba, or for that matter, easy access to veterinary care. Things that are important to many people with “fur kids”. And people who can’t bear to be separated from their pets long enough to go on vacation are usually beyond fussy about their care. Just saying…