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Can Cuban emigrants move back to Cuba?

I sat beside a Cuban lady on the plane on the way back to Canada. She immigrated to Canada but was in Cuba for 2 months visiting her family. She told me that she lives in Canada completely by herself - her husband died a few years ago in Canada - and all of her family - sons, mother, siblings live in Cuba. She had very broken English and I could not understand her very well so didn’t want to ask questions. She did tell me that her one son is a nurse and the other a physiotherapist in Cuba, so they have done well. But I am wondering if Cubans who emigrate from Cuba maybe aren’t allowed to move back? Anyone know how that works. I’m just curious.

Interesting question. A close Cuban friend ‘missed’ his flight back to Cuba after attending an academic conference in England about five years ago. Being proficient in English, he immediately found work in a call centre in Bristol.

Prior to leaving Cuba, he taught English Literature at a university and was a budding artist. However, the ‘existential angst’ that he required as an artist was not met doing shift work in a call centre in Bristol, so after about a year, he saved enough money to buy a flight back to Havana.

He is once again deep in ‘existential angst’ as an artist but now he is relegated to eking out his existence as a literacy instructor in a small, remote community.

So, yes … he was permitted to return, but there were consequences. I’m not sure what would be the ramifications for someone such as the woman you met on your flight, and look forward to hearing from others.

I have a friend at work who married to a Cuban girl. After 3 years in Canada the couple divorced and she returned to live in Cuba. That was 2 years ago

I would be interested to find this out also. I work with a girl who is currently living with a man who “missed his flight” while on a fuel stop over in Gander in 1990. He has since obtained Canadian Citizenship and would be traveling on a Canadian passport but he seems to think that he cannot go to Cuba and stay on a resort there. Does anyone know what happens in a case like this?

A Cuban friend of ours who has Permanent Resident status here in Canada, has been home to Cuba to visit family a few times.

Last year he took his 2 small daughters (who have both Cuban and Canadian citizenship) home to visit their great grandmother. The 3 of them stayed at Cameleon Villas Jibacoa for a few days so they could visit with friends in the area.
So from this I would conclude that Cuban emigrants, like Cuban residents, are allowed to stay at Resorts, as long as they have the money to pay ;D

Cubans living abroad have always been able to return and stay at resorts. It was a ridiculous situation… a Cuban returning to visit family on the Island could stay in a resort/hotel, but their Cuban family couldn’t join them. Correcting that idiocy was a good move by Raul.

And yes, a Cuban who immigrated can return to Cuba to live. Once a Cuban, always a Cuban…

[quote=@karmadoc]
Last year he took his 2 small daughters (who have both Cuban and Canadian citizenship)[/quote]

Are you sure about that? Because I don’t believe that Cuba recognizes dual-citizenship.

I was also under the impression that a Cuban who chooses to emigrate legally also forfeits some of his (or her) rights. They can go back, but they might face different living conditions. For example, I’d be very surprised to learn that a Cuban who worked in tourism got his (or her) job back. I understand that it can be done, but a special authorization is required, which is rarely granted.

Just because Cuba doesn’t recognize dual citizenship doesn’t mean that you can’t have it. Most of the Cubans living abroad - especially in the US - get their foreign citizenship and live as citizens of their adopted country. All this means is when they return to Cuba they do so as Cubans and using their Cuban Passports - Cuban Immigration doesn’t care that they hold another Passport as well. (The US doesn’t recognize dual citizenship either in most cases, but many people have two Passports.)

And yes, depending on the circumstances of their departure they can face certain sanctions if they return to live permanently, but this is rarely a factor because most of them are returning to retire and they’re doing that with foreign funds. Their Cuban pensions, etc. are not an issue.

The lady I sat with did say that she had both Cuban and Canadian citizenship. As I said, she had very broken English and I had a hard time understanding her, but she did say something about her job (not sure if she meant the one she has now in Canada or her previous job in Cuba) and that it costs a lot of money and is very hard. I don’t know if she meant it would cost a lot of money and is very hard to go back to Cuba or just what she was referring to. Her job was also mentioned in this reply (but she was in Cuba for 2 months so I’m wondering if she even has a job in Canada?), so maybe she was saying she wouldn’t have a job if she went back? I just felt really bad for her when she told me that she was all by herself in Canada while her entire family was in Cuba (she looked about 50 years old or so). Just wondered why she didn’t move back to Cuba to be with her family.

[quote=@annem][quote=@karmadoc]
Last year he took his 2 small daughters (who have both Cuban and Canadian citizenship)[/quote]

Are you sure about that? Because I don’t believe that Cuba recognizes dual-citizenship.
[/quote]

I’m pretty sure. The girls were born here in Canada to a Canadian mom, then dad went down to the Cuban Consulate and registered their births, claiming them as his, the children of a Cuban citizen.

I have a Cuban friend that has his permanent residency status here in Canada, yet went back to Cuba last fall, after the hurricanes. He thought it was a good idea at the time, to work in Cuba and make money to continue helping out the family while doing repairs from the hurricanes. In order for him to work in Cuba, he had to give up his permission from the Cuban government to be able to leave the country again. His residency status here is unchanged, however he is now unable to leave Cuba once again, without reapplying for that permission.
Hopefully it’s granted one day.

So to answer the question, yes, emigrants are allowed to return to their own countries. Just like if a Canadian left and returned. As far as jobs go there, that all depends on the job I suppose.

[Yes - I know a number of Cubans who have moved abroad and for various reasons later moved back.

Also, whilst Cuba does not formally recognise dual nationality, they do take it into account in some circumstances - it was much easier getting exit permits for my son because he also has a British passport.

[quote=@beardo][Yes - I know a number of Cubans who have moved abroad and for various reasons later moved back.

Also, whilst Cuba does not formally recognise dual nationality, they do take it into account in some circumstances - it was much easier getting exit permits for my son because he also has a British passport.[/quote]

If your son also has a Cuban passport, won’t he be required to do his military service in Cuba?

Does anyone know how difficult it is for a Cuban to get their permission again to leave the country
and emigrate back to Canada?

Generally it’s no big deal. There’s complications if they owe the government work/money for education, etc.

Really? I didn’t think they wanted the people to leave so easily.

[quote=@annem]
If your son also has a Cuban passport, won’t he be required to do his military service in Cuba?[/quote]

No idea - but he’s only 7, so there’s time for things to change.

Really? I didn’t think they wanted the people to leave so easily.[/quote]

Who do you think sends all the family remittances that represents a significant part of Cuba’s income ? The Cuba government needs that Cubans move to other countries - and then send funds back to their families in Cuba.

Pantomime, the problem is not exiting Cuba - that’s usually quite easy - it’s convincing another country to allow them entry…

Absolutely! And Canada is very difficult to convince to grant Visitors Visas :frowning: We’ve known a few Cubans who have had to fight quite the battle to come and visit, and it’s not just Cubans, very recently one Peruvian lady we know had a really tough time getting a visa to come and visit :-/