Home | Dominican Republic | Write a Review | Blog | Advertise

Good read


#1

From another forum a poster there put this up. I think it is a good read.

“How do forieners look at me as a Cuban?”


#2

Thanks Canuks, very good read indeed. Have passed it on to all my Cuba-loving friends (other than those on this forum, I mean, duh!)


#3

I also read it on another forum and enjoyed it and the comments that were made


#4

Thanks for the link. Very interesting.

When people ask on TA, I try my best to suggest that maybe the housekeepers really don’t need the hundreds of pairs of cheap pantyhose that they are given each year and a monetary tip (in CUCs) is so much better. What would you tip in a Canadian resort, then tip the same in Cuba.

When I was much younger, I once shoveled deep snow on a neighbour’s sidewalk for over an hour. She was weathly and elderly but I was given a banana for my labours. Learned one of my life skills right there and then.


#5

Reminds me of the time my husband did a similar favour for a neighbour who lived across the street from my mother. She gave him a book from her collection, which he accepted, not knowing what else to do. Later when she found out he was Mom’s son in law she was quite embarrassed. People don’t always read a situation correctly. :smiley:

Of course, if one were doing the job for compensation, it is always best to settle that up front. :wink:

I also read and replied on the thread mentioned. I was particularly interested in the contradiction in the reported feelings of the author.


#6

Many of us have friends and acquaintances who live in remote areas and appreciate certain supplies. Think about northern Canada and the chronic shortages there.
Here in NB we always appreciate a gift of “Half Price” milk, eggs or a frozen turkey from friends who visit Maine. :wink:

Anybody looking for a fair comparison between Cuban and New Brunswick tourism might check out Herb Curtis and his wonderful tales of US anglers on the Mirimachi. Luther Corhern’s Salmon Camp Chronicles ;D are amongst the best examples.

http://www.gooselane.com/books.php?ean=9780864922687

http://w3.stu.ca/stu/sites/nble/c/curtis_herb.html


#7

Really enjoyed that read. thanks for sharing… It reminds us that sometimes we should tip in monetery vs used stuff. quote DAX. however I find that by communicating with the locals there are items that are not available that they could really use from the great white north.

here is my story;
We, for the last many years, usually bring down school supplies (we purchase them this time of year “on special” and bring them down in November and March). I ‘ve known others that have brought down, electronic supplies, dental supplies,etc. fishing supplies. When these are given, it is always very greatly appreciated and you really feel it when you give it to them… Personally I would rather give some fishing paraphernalia to a local than some $$$. Actually last January when going to Club Bucanero we got in contact with the Hotel director (thanks again eeeefarm!) to ask some questions before coming down. I asked (via email) if we could bring anything down from Canada. She responded thanks but nothing is needed…so we elected to bring some school supplies. When we met up with her she was very grateful of the supplies. The week went by and it was a daily thing to drop in the office to say hello. Before we left Club Bucanero, we knew that we had very good friends that were going to visit the resort within a couple of weeks (we were scanning the place for them :wink: :sunglasses: ;D ;o) ). We asked the director if we could send things down with them for her family or the school. She mentioned that vitamin C was not available in Cuba (or that area) … so upon our arrival in Ottawa, we dropped in at Costco and picked a magnum bottle of chewable Vitamin C.; our friends dropped by to meet the hotel director and they told us that she was so grateful.
another time; Last March 2012 our last visit to Cuba, we made good friends with a local from Holguin and I asked: Can I bring anything back for you next year. He didn’t yes or no. on my last day he brought me a ziplock bag with about 60$ in change (Canadian $$) and provided a “list” of items that he could use. Packsak (schoolbag), Fall coat for child and if any $$ left over a pair of white baby shoes. We are hoping to deliver this in November this year :smiley: :smiley:
that being said…
Should we only tip and not worry about bringing any gifts down. it certainly would make life a lot easier for us :wink:


#8

Oh Spunky, if my Dad were alive today… he was from Bay du Vin (try finding THAT on the map) and knew (and fished) the Miramichi with his eyes closed. He would surely get a chuckle out of those “what-happens-in-Vegas…” tales lol

Regarding what ald wrote, I’d have fo sho more space in my suitcase if I didn’t have to bring 4 packages of diapers every time (!) but can u just imagine how life is easier for them with 'em? :smiley: It’s all good

(and no, Spunky, I’m not talking about Depends harhar)


#9

[quote=@zendudette]

I’d have fo sho more space in my suitcase if I didn’t have to bring 4 packages of diapers every time (!) but can u just imagine how life is easier for them with 'em? :smiley: It’s all good[/quote].

wish there was a “like” button on this forum :sunglasses: :slight_smile: :wink: :-*


#10

LIKE !!


#11

good one ;D
:sunglasses:


#12

Give it to the gardeners, the security guards, the one who mopping the floor all night at the resorts, the school teachers…
The person who wrote the article, look at his English writing skill he must belong to a rich family in Cuba. If you do not need it pass it to the others simple as that. I do not like the article because my luggage always checked in at 19.99999 kg and my carry on at 5.9999kg


#13

Wish there was a dislike button for all these “gifting” threads on Debbies.

What’s wrong with just going on a holiday to enjoy oneself & tipping where appropriate?


#14

It sure would make it easier :wink:


#15

In my opinion tipping and gifting should be the same in Cuba as at home. Tip for good service, not to get service. Give gifts to special friends, and if you want to help the poor, donate through a legitimate aid organization.


#16

yes as at home tips but NOT the same $'s as at home when you tip.


#17

Right!! I generally only spend about $10 to $15 per day on tips.


#18

!!!Thumbs Up!!!

Maybe I’m reading too much into this, as I actually found the ending quite puzzling, but mostly sad:

“… I smothered the incipient attack on my dignity in seconds. It was a luxury I couldn’t afford…”

She is a very good writer. This ending of hers is rather confusing, and yet, a very ambiguous response ~ this is an ending that, to me, contains a double meaning, and can be taken two ways. Here is how I take it:

She calls it an incipient attack on her dignity… yet smothered her initial response to that attack. Her dignity was gone, right then… in seconds. It was her dignity that was a luxury she couldn’t afford (not the soap!). When dignity is gone… then respect for oneself is lost, as well. And who’s at fault?

I agree with all those who maintain it’s the responsibility of the rich foreign visitor to act with respect and common sense while they’re a guest in their host country.

:-[ We’re embarrassed to admit (but have done so here, many times) that we, too, did this on our first visit :-[ But after feeling so uncomfortable with the whole situation, made up our minds to never do so again ~ and make a point to tell every person we know “Not” to do it either.