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I'm a letter mule but

I have a question about a letter I have been asked to take to Cuba. Part of the letter is an official document from the Cuban Embassy in Canada. It is to allow a Cuban to come to Canada for a visit. Should I have a concern about bringing this letter into Cuba for someone else? And do you think there is a problem if the intended receipient were to send this letter back with me? Just thought I’d check!

Thanks
Cubafanatic

Personally, unless I knew the intended recipient or sender well, I would not want the responsibility of ferrying back official documents. Personal letters, no problem. But anything of an official, governmental or business nature would make me hesitate.

Would it make you hesitate because of problem in Cuba at immigration/customs? Or because you would be having to bring it back and forth?

I would hesitate because of the weight of the responsibility involved. I have, potentially, someone’s future in my hands. If anything happened to the document (lost, stolen, siezed at customs, whatever), I would feel terrible about it. Even if it wasn’t my fault. :-/

Also, if I was transporting a document which, unbeknownst to me, carried legal or government implications, I would not want to risk being an accidental accessory.

I wouldn’t hesitate to take a legal, notarized document. If it is legal for them to come to Canada, then what would Cuba Immigration, in the unlikely event they found it on you, care? Yes of course there is some responsibility but I would trust a legal document to a responsilbe individual more than to a courier company. I don’t see it as being a problem. IF for some reason you lose it, or it gets stolen, that’s a risk that the sendee is obviously going to have to take.

They are actually going to a cook at one of the other resorts. Hand off shouldn’t be a problem. I was just worried I might have been opening up a can of worms for myself!

Thanks!

I wouldn’t worry about the documents themselves for one second. No big deal there.

The only hassle is the rendezvous and hand-off in Cuba. Those arrangements rarely go as planned and you can end up wasting hours and hours. Unless you’re good pals with the recipient I’d suggest making plans that the Cuban does the pick-up directly from you at the resort, or from a drop-off point that’s convenient for you. Running around trying to be a courier for someone you don’t know can easily turn into an exercise in frustration.

Carrying the documents themselves are a non-issue though.

Whoops, our posts got reversed after I cleaned up some of my usual bad spelling and grammar.

In any case, zero worries regarding the documents themselves.

Have fun.

Herein lies the problem: many of us would, indeed, feel a personal responsibility and guilt over the missing document. I would not want to risk it. I have absolutely no problem with carrying regular letters and gifts. But anything that has legal ramifications is not something with which I want to be involved…

“… But anything that has legal ramifications is not something with which I want to be involved…”

That’s harsh.

Research courier prices (and dependability) between Cuban and the rest of the planet and you’ll see why people are desperate for friends/acquaintances (and yes, even strangers from the Internet) to carry important documents.

Although it’s a bit more intense than the example we’re discussing, this famous quote from Edmund Burke came to mind:

“All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing” :wink:

I play “mule” every trip down and back and am happy to do it. As long as I know what I’m taking down and it doesn’t impact overly on my weight allowance, I’ll help. As Martian mentioned, getting things in and out of Cuba can be frustrating so, if you aren’t transporting something illegal, why not lend a hand?

I have no problem with this. :sunglasses:

Thanks to everyone for their input!

I have done some research and the “document” I was sent and it is actually downloaded from the internet on the Cuban Embassy site. It is something to be filled out by both people and then notarized. So it is not like this document has cost a lot of money -that will come, it is $320 to have it put in!

Thanks again!

Hee Hee Hee…funny